Baraka

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Baraka
Barakacover.jpg
Director Ron Fricke
Runtime 96 mins
Country USA
Language None
Rating UK:PG
Australia:PG
Genre Documentary
Year of Release 1992
DVD Release Date 2001
Baraka at IMDB

The title of Baraka, a 1992 abstract documentary by Ron Fricke and Mark Magidson, roughly means "blessing" or "breath of life" in a number of languages. Over a period of 14 months (and a reported $4 million in expenses, an enormous budget for an experimental film), Ron and a small crew traveled around the world filming incredible and awe-inspiring scenery, people and rituals.

The movie itself echoes earlier projects like Koyaanisqatsi (and, of course, BME's own Uvatiarru), and consists of a series of scenes without dialog set to music. While some complain about decontextualization in many of the scenes, and the occasional political outburst that seems out of place, it is safe to say the general consensus is that Baraka is the pinnacle of this style of film making due to its incredible cinematography.

This movie contains some stunning photography of body modification around the world, including footage shot with the Maasai in Kenya, in the Amazon, and of bodysuits in Japan (scene six of the movie is literally titled "body adornment").

ISBN: B00005M91K (Find this at Amazon.com)

Footage shot with the Masai

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(note blow-out on the second guy in the top row)

Footage of Amazonian tribes

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Footage shot in Japan

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