Margaret Cho

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Margaret Cho
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Birth Date December 5, 1968
Birth Place San Francisco, California, USA
Death Date Living
Occupation Actor, Comedian, Fashion Designer, Author, Singer/Songwriter
Website http://www.margaretcho.com/


Contents

Biography

Margaret Moran Cho was born on December 5, 1968. She is an American comedian, fashion designer, actress, author, and singer-songwriter of Korean descent and is best known for her stand-up routines. She has also directed and appeared in music videos and has her own clothing line. She has frequently supported LGBT rights and has won awards for her humanitarian efforts on behalf of women, Asians, and the LGBT community.

As an actress she has played parts such as Charlene Lee in It's My Party and that of John Travolta's FBI colleague in the action movie Face/Off. She had her own television series, All American Girl, in 1994. She is part of the TV series Drop Dead Diva on Lifetime Television, playing the role of Teri Lee, a paralegal assistant.

She has authored two books. The first book is titled I'm the One That I Want, an autobiographical work which was also the title of one of her stand-up comedy tours and and a dvd based on that tour. She also authored I Have Chosen to Stay and Fight, a compilation of essays and prose about global politics, human rights, and other topical issues.

In September 2008, Cho released her single, "I Cho Am a Woman", on iTunes. Throughout 2010, she worked on a full length album, Cho Dependent. The album was released on August 24, 2010.

Cho began getting major tattoo work done in 2006 and has become an enthusiast.

Photos

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Quotes

  • As soon as I walked into the locker room, I felt uncomfortable. I guess I should mention here, Korean spas are, uh — well, clothing optional is not the right thing to call them. It’s more clothing non-optional, in that everyone is naked. Perhaps I do get stared at a lot because I am a heavily tattooed woman, but I am also a Korean woman, and I feel I have the right to be naked in the Korean spa with other Korean women. I don’t feel shame that my skin is decorated. My tattoos are my glory. I am happy in my skin and I am not sure what to say when others are not happy with my skin.[1]

External Links

References

1.http://www.margaretcho.com/2013/03/25/aroma-smells-like-bigotry/, Aroma Smells Like Bigotry

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