Endorphin Rush

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Many people claim to experience an '''endorphin rush''' after undergoing [[Body Modification|modifications]] or [[:Category:Rituals|rituals]].
 
Many people claim to experience an '''endorphin rush''' after undergoing [[Body Modification|modifications]] or [[:Category:Rituals|rituals]].
  
The human body does release endorphins. They are commonly associated with intake of tryptophan in the diet (commonly found in chocolate). Endorphins are the body's "happy hormones"
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The human body does release endorphins. They are commonly associated with intake of tryptophan in the diet (commonly found in chocolate). Endorphins are the body's "happy hormones".
  
 
However, they are not responsible for this effect. The supposed "endorphin rush" is more likely to be a burst of adrenaline (epinephrine), with the side-effect of numbing pain. This is a stress response, generally evoked in response to pain or fear and is a defence mechanism.
 
However, they are not responsible for this effect. The supposed "endorphin rush" is more likely to be a burst of adrenaline (epinephrine), with the side-effect of numbing pain. This is a stress response, generally evoked in response to pain or fear and is a defence mechanism.

Revision as of 02:10, 27 October 2009

Many people claim to experience an endorphin rush after undergoing modifications or rituals.

The human body does release endorphins. They are commonly associated with intake of tryptophan in the diet (commonly found in chocolate). Endorphins are the body's "happy hormones".

However, they are not responsible for this effect. The supposed "endorphin rush" is more likely to be a burst of adrenaline (epinephrine), with the side-effect of numbing pain. This is a stress response, generally evoked in response to pain or fear and is a defence mechanism.


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